Novel Coronavirus Update (COVID-19)

Coronavirus

8/5/2020 Update –  SEVEN NEW CASES OF COVID-19 CONFIRMED IN ADAIR COUNTY

SEVEN NEW CASES OF COVID-19 CONFIRMED IN ADAIR COUNTY

Kirksville, MO 8/6/2020 – With seven new cases of COVID-19 confirmed today among Adair County residents, the year-to-date total has risen to 146. The number of people now in isolation has risen to 19.

Of the seven new cases, one is a 24-year-old female infected by community spread. The other six are all employees of area meat-packing plants. They include a 49-year-old female and men ages 47, 36, 33, 41, and 37.

Statewide, 1,241 new cases were confirmed in the last 24-hour period. Although the majority of cases in Missouri year-to-date have been in the state’s most populated cities and towns, there have been recent signs of more rapid growth in rural areas of the state. Knox County, for example, spiked from seven cases year-to-date to 24 in just the past seven days, an increase of 17 cases.

“We’re starting to witness more creep into rural areas of the state,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “This is inevitable since people have been returning to more routine activities and traveling. Again, that’s why we’re urging people to stay vigilant by wearing masks, socially distancing, washing hands or using hand sanitizer, avoiding large groups of people, opting for outdoor rather than indoor activities outside of their homes, and whatever they do, staying at home if they don’t feel well,” he said.

“The fact is that now is the most critical time for us to take precautions because this is the most difficult time to control the spread,” LeBaron said. “Truman students are returning from areas that are hotspots, kids are getting ready to go back to school, people are taking summer vacations, and nearly all businesses are fully reopened. We’ve never been more exposed to COVID-19 than we are right now,” he said. “We also need to remember that Kirksville is a regional retail, healthcare, and education hub,” LeBaron said. “That means we’re watching what’s happening in surrounding counties because those residents are coming in and out of Adair County,” he said.

 

ADAIR COUNTY HITS 139 COVID-19 CASES YEAR TO DATE

Kirksville, MO 8/5/2020 – Five new confirmed cases of COVID-19 brings Adair County’s year-to-date total number of cases to 139. All five new cases were transmitted via community spread, and all are women, ages 19, 28, 29, 43, and 74. There are now 14 residents in isolation and 125 who have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has completed 812 contact-tracing calls.

As students return to Truman State University and prepare to return to Adair County elementary and secondary schools, the Adair County Health Department continues to encourage people to wear masks to reduce transmission of COVID-19.

“Although some of the nation’s hotspots are beginning to level off, the Midwest is becoming the new coronavirus hotspot,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House Coronavirus Task Force coordinator, acknowledged on Sunday that this new phase of the pandemic is ‘extraordinarily widespread,’ with cases spiking in rural areas,” LeBaron said. “We’ve all felt pretty safe in rural Missouri due to our relative isolation, but that’s giving us a false sense of security if we fail to take precautions to reduce the spread.”

Missouri is one of the Midwestern states cited for spikes in COVID-19 cases and deaths. In the 24-hour period one week ago, from July 29 to July 30, Missouri counted 2,084 new cases. From Monday, August 3 to Tuesday, August 4, there were 1,193 new cases reported statewide and 11 deaths.

“Dr. Birx, Dr. Anthony Fauci, and other health officials have stated that everyone should wear a mask when they’re out in public, especially when social distancing is difficult. But we see a lot of people in Adair County who aren’t wearing masks unless they’re entering a space where the retailer or business owner has made wearing a mask mandatory,” Le Baron said. “There’s a reason for taking this precaution, and it has nothing to do with politics. Masks have been proven to slow or stop transmission of this airborne virus,” he said. “Studies published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have proven that wearing masks is vital because up to 50% of people carrying the virus have no symptoms or have not yet shown symptoms but are highly contagious,” LeBaron said. “Everyone should just assume they have the virus and wear a mask to protect others.”

Studies published by the CDC have also shown that wearing even a cloth mask, along with taking precautions such as frequent hand-washing, social distancing, and avoiding crowds, also protects the mask-wearer from others who can transmit the virus to them.

Dr. Birx also recommended that because so many people are resuming normal activities outside the home, they should wear masks while at home if a member of the household is particularly vulnerable to the virus either because of their age or if they have other health conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and immuno-depressive disorders.

“We have no reason to panic in Adair County,” said LeBaron. “But we really, really need everyone to put on a mask to protect others and themselves. We don’t want to see cases spike here like we’re seeing in other parts of Missouri. Wearing masks, washing hands, and socially distancing will help keep every single one of us safe,” he said. “Community spread in other places has proven to be how transmission gets out of control. The fact that we’re seeing an uptick in community spread here is an early warning sign we should heed,” he said.

“I understand that some people think wearing a mask is somehow violating their personal rights,” LeBaron said. “That’s not the intent. This is like not allowing people to smoke in public spaces. Those rules weren’t put into place to take away a person’s right to smoke. They were put into place to protect the health of others who were inhaling second-hand smoke,” he said. “Wearing a mask is just the same. It protects others from infective airborne virus droplets.

“We’re okay in Adair County right now,” LeBaron said. “We’re asking everyone to do their part to keep it that way.”

 

SIX NEW CASES CONFIRMED IN ADAIR COUNTY SINCE JULY 31

Kirksville, MO 8/3/2020 – A 40-year-old female and a 34-year-old female tested positive for COVID-19 due to community spread. Four other cases involve employees at an area meat-processing plant: a 32-year-old female; a 46-year-old female; a 21-year-old male; and, a 27-year-old male. The six cases bring Adair County’s year-to-date total to134. Ten people remain in isolation and 124 have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has topped 800 contact-tracing calls.

 

ADAIR COUNTY CLOSES OUT JULY WITH 128 COVID-19 CASES

Kirksville, MO 7/31/2020 – As of July 31, 2020, Adair County has had 128 confirmed cases of COVID-19 among its residents. The most recent two cases involve a 26-year-old male working for a meat-processing plant and a 25-year-old female infected via community spread.

There are now eight residents in isolation and 120 who have left isolation since the first case was confirmed on March 21, 2020.

 

ADAIR COUNTY CASE COUNT REACHES 126

Kirksville, MO 7/29/2020 – A 25-year-old male and 54-year-old female have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the year-to-date case count for Adair County to 126. Both were infected as the result of community spread. There are now nine residents in isolation and 117 who have left isolation.

 

TESTS CONFIRM THE PINES RESIDENT NEGATIVE FOR COVID-19

Kirksville, MO 7/28/2020 – Additional testing of an 80-year-old male at The Pines has confirmed that the resident is negative for COVID-19.

Following the July 21, 2020 positive test of an employee of The Pines, all residents and all employees were tested twice to determine whether the virus had been transmitted to anyone else in the facility. The 80-year-old resident was tested initially using the ID Now rapid test which was negative. The subsequent test, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, came back positive, so he was tested a third time using the ID Now. When that test showed negative results, The Pines, at the recommendation of Justin Puckett, D.O., who is the physician advisor to the local Emergency Operations Command for COVID-19, conducted another PCR test and an antibody test. The results of the last two tests are negative.

“Although PCR tests have proven to be extremely reliable, they aren’t perfect 100% of the time,” Puckett said. “In this case, we believe the resident’s second test was a false positive, based partly on the fact that three other tests were negative and substantially on the fact that the antibody test showed no evidence of him ever having the virus,” he said.

Puckett said that false positives are far better than false negatives because the latter gives a false sense of security. Because two of the three initial tests were negative, and because the resident never exhibited symptoms of COVID-19, Puckett was suspicious about the positive test result. With the fourth test returning negative results and the antibody test showing no presence of the virus, The Pines will return to the limited facility access to the facility that was in place following the initial shutdown in April. The subject resident has been released from quarantine.

“The Pines did everything right. Upon learning of the positive test result of the employee, they tested all employees and residents twice and restricted access to the facility. When the resident tested positive in the second round of testing, he was quarantined immediately to limit potential exposure,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department.

“Immediate, decisive action taken by The Pines was critical in keeping the virus from spreading through the facility like we’ve seen happen in other places throughout the United States,” he said. “Residents of long-term care facilities are some of the most vulnerable to COVID-19 and need the most protection.”

The Pines employee remains in isolation, along with six other Adair County residents. Adair County has experienced no deaths from COVID-19 and only three people have required hospitalization. One hundred seventeen residents have left isolation.

 

FIVE MORE RESIDENTS TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19

Kirksville, MO 7/27/2020 – The Adair County Health Department reports that there have now been 124 residents who have tested positive for COVID-19 since testing began at the end of March. Four of today’s four cases are the result of community spread, a 25-year-old male, a 20-year-old male, a 54-year-old female, and a 61-year-old female. The fifth case is an 80-year-old male resident at The Pines long-term care facility.

On July 21, 2020, an employee of The Pines tested positive for the virus. Since then, all employees and residents have been tested twice. Out of 296 tests, only one has come back positive.

“In the first round of testing, we did 38 ID Now rapid tests and 110 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) nasopharyngeal swab tests,” said Jim Richardson, administrator of The Pines. “All 148 tests in the second round were PCR tests,” he said.

The resident who had a positive test result has now been tested four times. His test results were negative the first time then positive the second time. Following the positive PCR test, he was given a rapid test which came back negative. With differing results, the resident was tested a fourth time and the results of the PCR test are expected soon. He is currently in quarantine, pending the results of the test.

There are now ten residents in isolation and 114 who have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has completed 780 contact-tracing calls.

 

 

THREE MORE CASES BRING ADAIR COUNTY COUNT TO 119

Kirksville, MO 7/24/2020 – Three more Adair County residents have tested positive for COVID-19 which brings the county’s year-to-date case count to 119. The three cases involve a 59-year-old male who works at an area meat-processing plant, a 52-year-old female who traveled outside of Adair County, and a 69-year-old female who was infected by community spread. There are now seven people in isolation and 112 who have left isolation.

The 116th case reported on July 21, 2020, involved an employee of The Pines. No one else has tested positive following a first round of testing of employees and residents of the facility. A second round of testing is being conducted today.

“We’re encouraged by the results so far with COVID-19 testing at The Pines,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “The employee who tested positive wore a mask at all times when working at the facility. Wearing a mask and practicing good hygiene at a job where social distancing isn’t always possible made a difference,” he said.

“If the virus has not been passed on to anyone else who lives or works in the facility, it’s not just luck. It’s a testament to the difference wearing a mask, hand hygiene, and disinfecting commonly used surfaces can make to slow the spread of the virus,” LeBaron said.

 

ADAIR COUNTY REACHES 116 COVID-19 CASES

Kirksville, MO 7/21/2020 – A 40-year-old female is the 116th confirmed case of COVID-19 in Adair County. There are currently 11 people in isolation and 105 who have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has reached out to 750 people in its contact-tracing efforts.

The latest case involves an employee of The Pines long-term care facility in Kirksville. The Pines is testing all residents and employees using the Abbott ID Now rapid testing system. If any employee or resident who tests negative begins to exhibit symptoms, they will be tested again using the polymerise chain reaction (PCR) test which requires more time to obtain results.

The Pines employee’s temperature was normal when taken upon her arrival at the facility. Later, her throat started becoming sore which she reported to her supervisor, was immediately tested, and sent home to quarantine. She is now in isolation.

“We’re doing everything we can to protect our residents and our staff,” said Jim Richardson, administrator of The Pines. “Since the first case in Adair County, we’ve been restricting access to the facility, wearing N95 masks and other protective gear, and keeping the facility disinfected,” he said. “But at the end of their shift, our employees go home or to the grocery store or somewhere else where they can be infected. None of us lives in a bubble. We can only react quickly if someone does become infected,” he said.

“This is what happens with community spread,” said Jim LeBaron, Adair County Health Department administrator. “People pick up the virus somewhere in public and don’t immediately know they have it. Some don’t get the expected symptoms, like a temperature, and some have no symptoms at all. But once you’re infected, you’re infecting other people. That’s why wearing a mask, keeping your distance, and washing your hands is so very important to protecting other people,” he said.

Unlike other places in the country, Adair County has not experienced high numbers of known infections and cases have been relatively mild. Only three of the 116 people who tested positive have required hospitalization and none required a ventilator.

“We all need to continue taking precautions to keep transmission as low as possible,” LeBaron said. “But when we identify a case, we immediately react to take precautions, implement testing, and conduct contact-tracing efforts to learn where a person might have been infected and who else that person has come into close contact with,” he said.

The Adair County Health Department and the county’s Emergency Operations Command have worked to make the rapid testing available for healthcare providers and vulnerable populations, including long-term care facilities and nursing homes throughout northeast Missouri. For example, the Abbott ID Now equipment is located in Northeast Regional Medical Center whose lab staff process the tests. The Adair County Ambulance District maintains the inventory of ID Now test kits so they can be distributed rapidly to places where needed, like The Pines. The Kirksville Fire Department maintains an inventory of personal protective equipment (PPE) for use throughout the region should any facility run low.

“It takes all of our partners throughout the region, working together, to be responsive in situations exactly like this one,” LeBaron said. “Now is no time for any facility to have to go it alone. This is about the health of our entire community, and it takes every single one of us to keep it as healthy as possible,” he said.

 

 

MISSOURI CENTER FOR PUBLIC HEALTH EXCELLENCE RECOMMENDS WEARING MASKS IN PUBLIC

Kirksville, MO 7/20/2020 – A 21-year-old female who traveled outside the state is the latest Adair County resident to test positive for COVID-19. While Adair County’s 115 cases are lower than other parts of the state, Missouri hit a one-day total record of 958 new cases on Saturday. Missouri has surpassed 33,000 cases.

The Missouri Center for Public Health Excellence (MOCPHE) on July 15, 2020, formally recommended “…the use of face masks by the general public when outside the home and supports face mask requirements due to substantial evidence that they decrease the risk of transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Face masks will continue to be a critical tool to fight this virus as evidence grows that COVID-19 is spread by asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic individuals and face-to-face interactions increase.”

The mask recommendation is based upon research, modeling, and scientific analysis. In Missouri, Cape Girardeau, Columbia, Joplin, Kansas City, North Kansas City, Rolla, Springfield, St. Joseph, and St. Louis, as well as Boone, Clay, Jackson, Johnson, Platte and St. Louis counties mandate that people wear masks outside their homes.

“We haven’t experienced a huge spike in cases in Adair County, although the number of cases continues to rise,” said Jim LeBaron, Adair County Health Department administrator. “But science repeatedly demonstrates that wearing masks dramatically slows transmission of COVID-19. That’s why we’re asking that people follow MOCHPE’s recommendation and wear a mask when they leave their homes and enter a public space of any kind. Doing this one little thing just might keep us from experiencing what other communities and states are going through,” he said.

MOCPHE comprises public health members throughout the state, including the Adair County Health Department. Information about the research and MOCPHE’s mask recommendation can be found at https://www.mocphe.org/.

 

THREE NEW COVID-19 CASES PUT ADAIR COUNTY AT 114 

Kirksville, MO 7/17/2020 – Three new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed today, bringing the total number of cases in Adair County to 114. The new cases involve a 33-year-old male meat- processing plant employee, a 46-year-old female infected by community spread, and a 21-year-old female whose case is related to travel.  Eleven county residents are currently in isolation and 103 people who previously tested positive have left isolation.

“Adair County continues to have fewer cases of COVID-19 than many other counties in the state,” said Jim LeBaron, Adair County Health Department administrator. “To keep it that way, we’re encouraging people to voluntarily wear masks when around people outside of their household, to maintain social distancing, to practice good hand hygiene, and to stay at home if they don’t feel well. If we all take these steps to protect the people around us, maybe we can keep Adair County a safe place to be,” he said.

 

ADAIR COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT CONFIRMS TWO NEW CASES, ASKS RESIDENTS TO CONTINUE TAKING PRECAUTIONS

Kirksville, MO 7/16/2020 – Two new cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed today, bringing Adair County’s year-to-date total to 111 cases. The cases involve a 27-year-old female attributed to travel and a 22-year-old male attributed to community spread. There are currently eight people in isolation.

Jim LeBaron, Adair County Health Department administrator, said that so far, the county’s cases are low compared to other Missouri counties and other states, and there have been no deaths or cases serious enough to require ventilators.

“That said, the Adair County Health Department needs everyone’s help to keep our case counts low and keep our residents healthy,” LeBaron said. “Businesses have reopened and our economy is improving. Schools and universities are preparing to reopen in August. It’s time for each of us in Adair County to ask ourselves what we can do to support our hospitals, first responders, economy, businesses, and schools while protecting the other residents in our county – especially those who are most vulnerable to this virus,” he said.

LeBaron recommended six actions everyone can take to help keep Adair County as healthy as possible:

  1. Voluntarily make a personal investment to our community by wearing a face covering when in public for at least the next four weeks. This is a great way to protect one another, slow the spread of the virus, and welcome students back to school. Doing this now might help us avoid another shutdown in the fall.
  2. Maintain social distancing of six feet or more from anyone you don’t live with every time you’re around other people.
  3. Practice good hand-washing hygiene.
  4. Stay at home if you don’t feel well or if you suddenly lose your sense of taste or smell.
  5. Avoid large gatherings. The greater the number of people, the greater the risk of virus transmission.
  6. Respectfully observe and abide by the wishes of businesses, healthcare settings and other places that require masks be worn to protect their employees, patrons, patients, and visitors. Remember that everyone else wearing a mask is protecting you.

“Some people might wonder if taking these precautions is ‘worth it,’” LeBaron said. “I fully believe it is, based on what we’re witnessing in places where the virus is rampant.

“None of us want to be told what to do and how to do it, but for right now, each of us needs to do some things we don’t normally do to keep each other safe and healthy,” he said. “It’s good for our economy, our business and industry, our schools, our healthcare providers, our family, friends and neighbors and, yes, for our own personal health.”

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID-19 CASES HOLD AT 109

Kirksville, MO 7/15/2020 – No new cases of COVID-19 among Adair County residents have been confirmed today, holding the year-to-date case count at 109. Five people have left isolation since yesterday, leaving only six still in isolation.

Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department, said the infection sources of the 109 cases have followed a distinct trend.

“When Missouri and Adair County began sheltering in place in late March and early April, our first 13 cases were related to travel and community spread. From mid-May through the end of June, most cases were related to area meat processing plants, although there continued to be some cases of community spread,” LeBaron said. “In the last 15 days, we’ve had 14 cases reported with only one related to a plant. The other 13 have been identified as community spread, travel related, and three related to a religious gathering. That’s because people have been venturing back out into the community, holding group events again, and restarting travel,” he said.

LeBaron said that reopening Adair County was expected to result in an uptick of cases related to travel, community spread, and large gatherings, particularly in the midst of summer holidays.  While reopening the economy has benefited local businesses, the risks of transmission of COVID-19 have not really changed.

“The virus is still out there and will be until we have vaccines available. That means that while people are venturing out again, they need to remember to take precautions to avoid outbreaks like we’re seeing in other parts of the state and the nation,” LeBaron said.

“Remember to maintain social distancing and wear a mask when doing so is difficult or impossible. Wash your hands often and use hand sanitizers when soap and water aren’t readily available,” he said. “Be smart, be safe, and take steps to protect people around you, especially the elderly, chronically ill, and others who are most vulnerable to the disease.”

 

FREE COVID-19 TESTING IN MACON AS ADAIR COUNTY REACHES 109 CASES

Kirksville, MO 7/14/2020 – Cases of COVID-19 reached 109 among Adair County residents today with a 27-year-old male in a travel-related exposure. He is now one of 11 people in isolation. Ninety-eight people have left isolation after testing positive since the beginning of the year. More than 3,000 tests have been performed in Adair County to date.

Any Missouri resident can register for a free COVID-19 testing clinic administered by the Missouri National Guard at the Macon County Fairgrounds on Monday, July 20, 2020 from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. The Macon County Health Department, in collaboration with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, is hosting the National Guard’s testing clinic.

No physician’s order for testing is necessary; however, registration is required. Visit www.health.mo.gov/communitytest to register online or call 877-435-8411 to register by phone.

 

THREE MORE ADAIR COUNTY RESIDENTS TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19

Kirksville, MO 7/13/2020 – A 64-year-old male, a 20-year-old female, and 21-year-old female have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the county’s year-to-date total to 108. The man’s case and the 21-year-old woman’s case are related to community spread and the 20-year-old’s case is related to travel.

Twelve residents are currently in isolation and 96 people have left isolation. To date, only three of the 108 infected people have required hospitalization, and none have required use of a ventilator. Staff with the Adair County Health Department have exceeded 720 contact-tracing calls.

“As the pandemic continues, people are hearing a lot of conflicting information about the virus,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Much of that can be attributed to the fact that COVID-19 has been far more unpredictable than many other viruses, and we’re learning more and more about it every day. Rather than get confused by all the conflicting information, people should just remember to do the three things that have been fairly consistent in controlling the spread of the virus. Wash your hands, practice social distancing, and wear a mask,” he said. “Until there are effective therapeutic treatments and a vaccine, these precautions are the best thing each of us can take to slow the spread.”

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY CASE COUNT NOW STANDS AT 105

Kirksville, MO 7/10/2020 – A 50-year-old male is the latest Adair County resident to test positive for COVID-19 this year. The man’s infection is travel related.

Nine Adair County residents are in isolation and 96 residents have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has completed 689 contact-tracing calls to potentially infected persons.

 

ADAIR COUNTY REPORTS 104th COVID-19 CASE

Kirksville, MO 7/7/2020 – The Adair County Health Department reports four new cases of COVID-19 among residents today, bringing the year-to-date total to 104. Three of the cases, men ages 41, 57, and 69, are related to a church revival held in Macon, Missouri from June 28 through July 1. The fourth new case is a 24-year-old female infected by community spread.

“The cases stemming from the church revival in Macon illustrate the need for people to maintain social distance and wear masks if they attend group events,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Taking these precautions should reduce the spread of the virus among people who have gathered for any type of occasion,” he said.

There are currently 11 Adair County residents in isolation now and 93 who have left isolation.

 

PARTNERS BRINGING MEDICAL SURGE RESPONSE SHELTERS TO REGION

Kirksville, MO 7/7/2020 – The Northeast Missouri Health Council and Adair County Health Department have partnered to bring two medical surge response shelters to northeast Missouri. Estimated delivery of the two shelters is September.

The mobile shelters are equipped with LED lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) units powered by fuel generators. They feature an aluminum framework covered with insulated vinyl and flooring and can be entirely enclosed or opened at each end for drive-through clinics. The disassembled units will be stored in an 18-foot enclosed trailer when not in use. Each unit requires four to six people to set them up at any location. The shelters are designed to withstand rain, snow, and high winds.

Ronald Stewart, planner for the Adair County Health Department, said the mobile shelters will be used for vaccine drive-through clinics and can be used to house people during weather emergencies, power outages, and other emergency events that force them from their homes. The units can also be fitted with beds to treat patients in the event hospitals are filled to capacity during the pandemic or during other major disasters.

“This is a turnkey operation,” Stewart said. “We will even receive a full day of training on setting up, taking down, and storing the shelters. Not only our staff will be trained, but staff from other health departments, emergency responders, and healthcare providers in the region will also be trained,” he said.

As a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), the Northeast Missouri Health Council (NMHC) is eligible to receive federal emergency funds for COVID-19 initiatives.  The NMHC Board of Directors voted to invest the $128,000 in emergency funds to purchase the units.

“It was really a no-brainer for us to use one-time emergency funding that’s available to us as an FQHC to make this option available, when such funding is not available to the Adair County Health Department or any other entity in the region,” said Andy Grimm, chief executive officer of the Northeast Missouri Health Council. “The Health Department will store the units and coordinate their use with the Adair County Emergency Operations Command and with other county health departments and hospitals throughout northeast Missouri. It’s a win-win for everyone,” Grimm said.

“The purchase of these shelters by the Northeast Missouri Health Council is a big step toward having the resources we need to vaccinate residents for both influenza and for COVID-19 when that vaccine is available,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “The units offer an enclosed, temperature-controlled space that’s safe and comfortable for people driving through while protecting our staff and all of our community healthcare partners responding to COVID-19 and other potential public health emergencies,” he said. “It’s likely that the COVID-19 vaccine will be ready in the dead of the northeast Missouri winter, so we need a place to administer the vaccine where it’s safe for residents and staff.”

NMHC has medical and dental clinics in Kirksville, Macon and Kahoka, and medical clinics in Edina and Milan, providing services throughout northeast Missouri.

Grimm said the sparser population spread throughout northeast Missouri as opposed to other areas of the state often puts the region at a disadvantage for funding and resources, but it’s the willingness of healthcare providers and health departments to work across county lines that ensures service to area residents, especially during times of public health emergencies and natural disasters.

“We all either come together and figure it out on our own or what needs to happen doesn’t,” Grimm said.

 

ADAIR COUNTY REPORTS 100th COVID-19 CASE

Kirksville, MO 7/6/2020 – A 23-year-old female is the 100th case of COVID-19 in Adair County since the beginning of the year. The woman’s infection is attributed to community spread. There are now seven people in isolation and 93 people who have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has completed 681 contact-tracing calls to date.

 

ADAIR COUNTY NEARS HOLIDAY WEEKEND WITH 99 TOTAL CASES 

Kirksville, MO 7/2/2020 – As people kick off the Fourth of July holiday, the COVID-19 case count since January 1, 2020 for Adair County has reached 99. Seven people are in isolation and 92 have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has conducted more than 640 contact-tracing calls.

The four latest cases reported involve a 50-year-old male working at a meat-processing plant, a 34-year-old male whose case is travel-related, and a 21-year-old female and male whose infections are the result of community spread.

“Community spread is how we categorize a case when we don’t know how someone became infected with COVID-19,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Those are the cases we don’t want to have in our community because we can’t determine who transmitted the disease and therefore can’t get a complete picture in our contact-tracing efforts,” he said.

Contact tracing begins by talking to the person who has just tested positive to determine other people that person might have had close contact with. Those people might be encouraged to be tested and to monitor any symptoms, although many people are asymptomatic which means they never display known symptoms of COVID-19. People who have had close contact with the infected person are asked to quarantine themselves for 14 days to reduce the chance of further transmission of the virus.

“As people leave their homes for the holiday weekend, it’s helpful to note what other people they have close contact with. If someone later tests positive, remembering who that person had close contact with will help with contact tracing,” LeBaron said.

LeBaron also reminds people who decided to venture outside their homes to take precautions as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Those precautions include maintaining a distance of six feet or more between you and anyone outside of your household, wearing a mask, washing hands frequently with soap and water or using hand sanitizer if soap and water aren’t available, and refraining from potluck and picnic-types of eating. The same social distancing rule applies when spending time at pools and beaches. You should maintain at least six feet between you and anyone who doesn’t live with you, and wear a face mask when you’re not in the water. Wearing masks is not advised for children under the age of two, people who have difficulty breathing, people who are unconscious or incapacitated, or for anyone unable to remove the mask without assistance.  The CDC guidelines for going out in public can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html.

LeBaron said that some people in the community have been confused by differing case numbers reported by different entities on websites ranging from the CDC, Johns Hopkins University, media outlets, and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

“Reporting entities such as testing labs are required to notify the local health department of any positive results for any of their residents,” LeBaron said. “We know that our numbers are as current as possible at all times. Even the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services’ website is often behind on reported numbers, because it takes time for them to update its website, and the website states there is a 72-hour delay in numbers because the Department needs to verify them before updating the site,” he said.

“It’s also helpful to know that our numbers are for Adair County residents only, no matter where they were tested. Even though many people are tested at clinics in Adair County, if they don’t live here, their numbers aren’t included in our case count,” LeBaron said. “All positive cases are included in the count of the county or municipality they reside in.”

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services features a “Missouri COVID-19 Dashboard” on its website. The dashboard provides detailed demographics for counties and municipalities. The dashboard can be accessed at http://mophep.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=8e01a5d8d8bd4b4f85add006f9e14a9d.

 

 

Kirksville, MO 6/30/2020 – The total COVID-19 year-to-date case count in Adair County stands at 95 as of today. Only six people are in isolation and 89 have left isolation. The last three cases involve a 22-year-old male infected by community spread, a 51-year-old male employee of an area meat-processing plant, and a 26-year-old male whose case is related to recent travel. As the Fourth of July holiday weekend approaches, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is forecasting a spike in COVID-related deaths nationwide by July 18, 2020. Missouri is among the 13 states the CDC believes will see more deaths in the next four weeks than occurred during the past four weeks.

“We have been lucky in Adair County so far,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Cases in much of Missouri are rising, and the CDC thinks it’s going to get even worse with the Fourth of July weekend upon us. We’re moving in the wrong direction right now,” he said.

To date, Adair County has had no COVID-related deaths and only three people have been hospitalized, none of whom required a ventilator.

“The Fourth of July holiday has typically been a time of gathering with family and friends and there’s a temptation to just celebrate as usual. But people really need to rethink how they celebrate this year,” LeBaron said. “There might be people traveling to Adair County who bring the virus with them, and there might be people who live here who travel outside of the county who might then bring the virus back with them,” he said. “Everyone needs to take precautions to help keep the spread of COVID-19 to a minimum here. We’ve been doing a good job so far.”

The CDC website offers recommendations for safely navigating being out in public. Among the recommendations are maintaining social distance of six feet or more, wearing a mask, and washing your hands frequently or using hand sanitizer when soap and water aren’t available.

“The research has shown that being outside is better than being inside. Maintaining social distance is better than close contact. Brief contact is better than extended contact. And wearing a mask helps control the spread of the virus,” LeBaron said. “Of course, staying home with household members is the best way to celebrate. But if you think you have to gather with other people, just be smart about it and take the recommended precautions. Above all, if you don’t feel well, stay at home,” he said.

The CDC also recommends avoiding shared food and drinks at gatherings that involve anyone outside of your household, so family reunion-style picnics should be replaced by people bringing their own food and drinks to consume.

“Keep in mind that taking the recommended precautions doesn’t just benefit you. They protect others whose age and health issues might make the virus more severe if not deadly for them,” LeBaron said. “Maybe having the entire family gather at grandma’s house this year isn’t the safest thing for grandma. But if you do, make sure you wear a mask to protect her, keep your distance, and give her an option other than communal food,” he said. “When you’re deciding what you’re going to do and where you’re going to go, think about other people as well as yourself.”

The CDC guidelines for going out in public can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html.

 


6/18/2020 Update – ADAIR COUNTY COVID-19 CASES HIT 92

How Covid-19 Can Spread in Community Video

ADAIR COUNTY COVID-19 CASES HIT 92

Kirksville, MO 6/22/2020 – The number of Adair County residents who have tested positive for COVID-19 since the beginning of the year has reached 92. A 25-year-old female has been infected by community spread. The other five cases, a 26-year-old and a 40-year-old female, and a 24-year-old, 38-year-old, and 52-year-old male, are related to area meat-processing plants.

The Adair County Health Department reports that 16 people are now in isolation and 76 people have left isolation. Health Department staff have conducted 520 contact-tracing interviews.

 

ADAIR COUNTY RESIDENTS INVITED TO TAKE ONLINE SURVEY

Kirksville, MO 6/18/2020 – The Adair County Health Department has published a brief, three-question survey on its website and on its Facebook page for county residents. The survey, which takes seconds to complete, asks how many people live in their residence, how many of those plan to get the seasonal influenza vaccine at the October 14, 2020 drive-through clinic, and how many plan to get the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available this winter.

“Drive-through vaccination clinics take a lot of planning and coordination and a lot of staffing – many more people than just our Health Department staff,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “If we can anticipate the demand for these clinics among our residents, we can do a much better job preparing for them. That’s why we’re asking one resident from every household in Adair County to take a minute to complete this brief survey,” he said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone age 6 and older get the annual seasonal influenza vaccine. Although the ‘flu vaccine does not protect people against COVID-19, it has other benefits, such as warding off the 2020-2021 seasonal ‘flu which could strain not only your health but healthcare resources in general.

There is currently no vaccine for COVID-19; however, it is anticipated that effective vaccines will be ready by the end of the year. As production of a vaccine is ramped up for mass distribution, healthcare and other essential workers, as well as vulnerable populations, will probably be among the first to be administered the vaccine. Those guidelines will be developed by the CDC and other healthcare organizations when the COVID-19 vaccine becomes available.

“With so many unknowns at this time about a COVID-19 vaccine, comprehensive planning efforts are critical to being able to get it distributed quickly and efficiently when it does become available,” LeBaron said. “We need your help and input through this survey to do the best planning possible. Thanks for taking the time to provide your input,” he said.

One member from every Adair County household can access the Health Department’s survey on its website, https://adair.lphamo.org/, or on its Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/Adair-County-Health-Department-358830512380.

 

 

STAYING SAFE WHEN GOING OUT

Kirksville, MO 6/17/2020 – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published guidelines for people re-emerging from shelter-in-place orders. The guidelines are intended to help people stay safe as restrictions are lifted, bearing in mind that cases of COVID-19 continue to increase in Adair County and across the country and there is still no vaccine.

Although there’s no sure-fire way to be protected except for remaining at home with no contact with other people, the CDC has now offered information to help people who want to venture back into public spaces make wise decisions about doing that as safely as possible. There is no single, straightforward recommendation. Instead, the CDC advises people to consider four basic areas, including distance, environment, activity, and time, and the increased or decreased risk of transmission with those four alone and in combination with one another.

There has now been time for researchers to study data related to people who have had COVID-19 and how the virus was transmitted to them. What those studies have shown in aggregate is that maintaining a safe distance from other people outside of your household is safer than not and that distance depends on the type of activity you’re engaged in.

For example, if people are singing, they’re throwing more droplets into the air which increases the likelihood of transmission over people who are speaking normally. Avoiding large gatherings is safer. Being outdoors is generally safer than being indoors because droplets fall to the ground more quickly outdoors than indoors, particularly in poorly ventilated spaces. Exposure to virus transmission is heightened the longer you have close contact with other people, meaning there’s less than six feet between you. And close contact lasting less than 15 minutes with others decreases the likelihood of transmission.

What this means is that even if you’re outside rather than inside for a wedding, you should still maintain social distancing, limit close contact with anyone outside of your household, and wear a mask. Taking a walk outdoors with a friend is better than being inside at a gym, but if you’re not wearing masks, you should maintain more than six feet of distance because breathing harder expels more droplets into the air which travel greater distances than occurs with normal breathing. Or, someone who works in a grocery store is more likely to be infected with the virus than those who visit the store because the employee is there for hours, unlike the customer who enters and leaves within minutes.

As people return to public spaces, the CDC recommends that people wear masks, especially when social distancing is difficult or impossible to maintain. The CDC also recommends washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after touching items such as groceries, gas nozzles, menus, and door handles, and to avoid touching your face unless you’ve washed your hands. If soap and water aren’t readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cough or sneeze into your elbow and if you have to blow your nose, wash or sanitize your hands immediately after disposing of the tissue in the trash.

The CDC warns that many people are infected with COVID-19 but don’t know it because they have no symptoms. Everyone should assume they’re infected and take precautions to not spread the virus to anyone else when in public.

Foremost in its recommendations, the CDC states that if you don’t feel well, stay home and away from other people. And if you are age 65 or older or if you suffer from other health conditions that have proven to make people particularly vulnerable to more serious cases of COVID-19, including moderate to severe asthma, diabetes, chronic lung disease, serious heart conditions, severe obesity, chronic kidney disease, liver disease, and any condition that renders you with a compromised immune system, you should avoid public places. If you have to go out, do so with extreme caution.

To read current CDC guidelines and recommendations about returning to public spaces, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html.

Since January 1, 2020, Adair County has had 87 residents who have tested positive for COVID-19. Of those, 23 people are in isolation and 64 people have left isolation. The Adair County Health Department has contacted more than 507 people in its contact-tracing efforts. The latest reported case involves a 38-year-old male who works in an area meat-processing plant.

 

 

TWO NEW CASES BRING ADAIR COUNTY TOTAL TO 86

Kirksville, MO 6/15/2020 – A 27-year-old male employee of an area meat-processing plant and a 78-year-old male are the latest Adair County residents to test positive for COVID-19. Eighty-six residents have tested positive since the beginning of the year. Twenty-three people are now in isolation and 63 have left isolation.

The 78-year old’s infection is the result of community spread. Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department, said that with the reopening of the local economy, community spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus is inevitable.

“With community spread, we don’t know for certain how the virus was transmitted to an individual,” LeBaron said. “The only thing people can do to minimize this type of spread is to continue taking precautions. That means not leaving the house if you feel ill. It means washing your hands and disinfecting frequently used surfaces and objects like your cell phone. It means putting at least six feet between you and other people and wearing a mask when keeping that distance is difficult. And it means avoiding large crowds of people,” he said.

Statewide, in one week, the number of positive cases rose by 1,430 and the number of deaths rose by 70. In Adair County, the number of cases has increased by nine in one week.

“The virus is still out there, infecting people and killing people,” LeBaron said. “We’re fortunate that we have not had a death resulting from COVID-19 in Adair County, and I hope we can keep it that way. But slowing the spread means that each and every resident of the county has to continue to be vigilant and take the precautions recommended by the CDC. We can’t let up until we have effective treatments and vaccines. If we do, a lot more people are going to suffer the consequences of this virus,” he said.

“We’ve done fairly well in Adair County so far and I know people are weary of taking precautions, but it’s what we have to do for the foreseeable future. I hope everyone will keep up the good work.”

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY CASES CONTINUE TO RISE

Kirksville, MO 6/12/2020 – The number of COVID-19 cases among Adair County residents continue to rise. One week ago, the Adair County Health Department reported 72 cases year to date. One week later, the total case count stands at 84. Five new cases were reported on Monday. Since then, the Health Department has been notified of seven additional cases. Four of those cases are related to area meat-processing plants. Three, involving a 19-year-old male, a 19-year-old female, and a 71-year-old female, resulted from community spread. “Community spread” means how those individuals were infected with the virus is undetermined.

“Although the Governor has decided to ease restrictions throughout the State as of next Tuesday, Adair County continues to see an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Despite easing of restrictions, people need to continue taking precautions of washing their hands, maintaining social distancing and wearing masks in public when distancing is difficult,” LeBaron said.

LeBaron said the continued spread in Adair County isn’t just a problem for residents who work in area meat-processing plants. The community spread indicates the virus is circulating outside of those plants and infecting people randomly.

“People need to continue to be cautious,” LeBaron said. “Despite the reopening of the economy, nothing has changed since we all were ordered to shelter in place. There is still no proven treatment and still no vaccine and until there is, it’s the responsibility of every single person to take steps to protect themselves and others from spreading the virus,” he said. “This virus doesn’t care about the economy. It’s up to each of us to protect the most vulnerable people around us.”

As of today, 21 Adair County residents are in isolation and 63 have left isolation after testing positive for the virus.

 

 

MORE PEOPLE LEAVE ISOLATION IN ADAIR COUNTY

Kirksville, MO 6/9/2020 – Another seven Adair County residents who previously tested positive for COVID-19 have left isolation as of today. Fifty-eight out of 77 people have now recovered. Nineteen residents remain in isolation.

As of today, 1,919 tests have been administered in Adair County with 1,715 negatives and 119 positives. The 119 positives include people who live outside of Adair County and people who received follow-up testing after testing positive. The Adair County Health Department is awaiting results for 85 people who have been tested.

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID CASE UPDATE

Kirksville, MO 6/8/2020 – The Adair County Health Department reports that a 52-year-old female resident has tested positive for COVID-19 as the result of community spread. Four males related to area meat-processing plants, a 19-, 34-, 44- and 59-year-old, have also tested positive which brings Adair County’s total case count to 77 year to date. Twenty-six individuals are currently in isolation. Another six people have left isolation which brings that total to 51.

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID CASE UPDATE

Kirksville, MO 6/5/2020 – A 38-year-old male Adair County resident who works at an area meat-processing plant has tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the county’s year-to-date total to 72. Twenty-seven individuals are currently in isolation. Three more people have left isolation since yesterday’s report, bringing that total up to 45. Adair County Health Department staff have now completed nearly 430 contact-tracing interviews.

 

CASES TOP 70 IN ADAIR COUNTY

Kirksville, MO 6/4/2020 – Confirmation of six more positive cases of COVID-19 among Adair County residents put the total number of cases since January 1 at 71. There are now 29 people in isolation and 42 individuals who have left isolation.

Four of the six new cases, two 33-year-old females, a 31-year-old male and a 46-year-old male, are related to are meat-processing plants. The other two cases, a 21-year-old female and a 23-year-old female, are the result of community spread, meaning the source of their infections is undetermined.

The Adair County Health Department continues contact-tracing efforts. To date, staff have contacted and interviewed 421 people who had close contact with one or more of the people who have tested positive.

Also as of today, 1,722 people have been tested for COVID-19 at various sites in Adair County. There have been 1,494 negative results, 96 positives, and 132 results pending. The 96 positives include retesting of people who tested positive previously, as well as testing of individuals who reside outside of Adair County.

 

ADAIR COUNTY CASES AT 65 TODAY

Kirksville, MO 6/3/2020 – Three additional confirmed cases of COVID-19 among Adair County residents today brings the total case count year to date to 65. Two of the cases, a 30-year-old male and a 33-year-old female, are related to area meat-processing plants. The third case involves a 56-year-old male Adair County farmer. There are now 23 people in isolation and 42 individuals have left isolation. The Health Department has completed 399 contacts with individuals who might have been in close contact with the 65 positive individuals.

As the state’s economy continues to open, Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department, reminds residents to continue taking precautions.

“If you feel ill, stay at home and call your doctor or healthcare provider,” LeBaron said. “If you want to attend any type of gathering in excess of 10 people, use common sense by maintaining social distancing and wearing a mask if maintaining six feet or more between you and other people is impossible. Remember that anyone, whether they have symptoms of the virus or not, can be infectious,” he said. “Just act like you have the virus and take steps to protect others around you at all times.”

In addition to these precautions, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends coughing or sneezing into your elbow, frequent handwashing with soap and water, and to avoid touching your face, especially your mouth, nose and eyes.

 

COVID-19 CASE COUNT TOPS 60

Kirksville, MO 6/1/2020 – Positive results for nine more Adair County residents have been reported since last Friday, bringing the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases to 62. All nine of the new positives, five males and four females, are related to area meat-processing plants.

Although the number of positive cases year to date rose dramatically over the weekend, so did the number of people who have now left isolation. Thirty-three of the confirmed cases are out of isolation, up from 15 as of Friday. Twenty-nine people are currently in isolation.

Also good news is that to date, there have been no COVID-related deaths in Adair County and only three people have needed to be hospitalized. None of the three residents required a ventilator and all were discharged to their homes.

The Adair County Health Department continues to focus on contact-tracing efforts to mitigate transmission to other county residents. In addition to delivering all of its routine public health services, staff have contacted more than 350 people who might have had close contact with the 62 positive individuals year to date.

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID-POSITIVE NUMBER HITS 53

Kirksville, MO 5/29/2020 – A 38-year-old female employee at an area meat-processing plant is the latest Adair County resident to test positive for COVID-19. Fifty-three people have now tested positive since January 1, 2020, with 38 now in isolation.

Missouri Governor Mike Parson has extended the state’s Phase 1 recovery measures through June 15, 2020. The Phase 1 plan includes orders to “…adhere to social distancing requirements, including maintaining six feet of space between individuals in most cases.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people wear masks to protect others in public places where social distancing is not possible or is unpredictable. Anyone who has any symptoms of COVID-19 should isolate at home. But the CDC’s current “best estimate” of the percentage of people who have no symptoms but are infected with the virus is 35%. Wearing masks helps prevent transmission of the virus from asymptomatic carriers to other people.

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID-POSITIVE NUMBER TOPS 50

Kirksville, MO 5/28/2020 – There are now 52 Adair County residents who have tested positive for COVID-19 since the beginning of the year. Of those, 37 people are in isolation and 15 have left isolation.

Three females, ages 23, 26 and 28, are the most recent people to have positive test results. One is related to an area meat-processing plant. Transmission of the virus to the other two women was due to community spread which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines as “spread of an illness for which the source of infection is unknown.”

“One of the three women is an officer with the Kirksville Police Department who likely was infected by a person she came in contact with while on duty,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “It’s probable that the person did not have symptoms of the virus at the time but was infected and transmitted the virus to the officer,” he said.

The Health Department has contacted officers and staff with the Kirksville Police Department and will continue to monitor the situation. The Adair County Health Department conducts contact-tracing efforts for all individuals who test positive for the disease.

“This is exactly how community spread occurs,” LeBaron said. “An infected person randomly comes into close contact with another person who later tests positive for the virus. That’s why each of us has to take steps to protect other people around us, particularly people like law enforcement, healthcare workers, first responders, and those people who go to work every day to make sure there are groceries on the shelves and our prescriptions are filled,” he said.

To control community spread of COVID-19, residents are encouraged to maintain social distancing, wear masks in public spaces where social distancing is not possible or is unpredictable, wash hands with soap and water frequently for at least 20 seconds, and avoid touching your face, particularly the eyes, nose and mouth.

 

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID-POSITIVE NUMBER REACHES 49

Kirksville, MO 5/27/2020 – Two individuals related to area meat-processing plants have become the 48th and 49th Adair County residents to have tested positive for COVID-19 year to date. The Adair County Health Department has been notified of positive results for a 37-year-old male and a 22-year-old male. There are now 34 people in isolation and 15 who have left isolation.

Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department, advises residents to remain vigilant to keep the spread of the virus down to a minimum.

“Keep practicing those things that have been recommended by health experts and scientists, including washing your hands, not touching your face, staying six feet away from others and wearing a mask in public to protect others just in case you’re carrying the virus,” LeBaron said. “Wearing masks isn’t a political statement. It’s a precaution that can help reduce transmission of the virus, particularly from people who don’t have symptoms, to other people. If everyone will be careful, we can minimize transmission while we wait for effective treatments and a vaccine to be developed,” he said.

 

47 COVID-19 CASES YEAR TO DATE BUT PEOPLE LEAVING ISOLATION

Kirksville, MO 5/26/2020 – There have now been 47 confirmed cases of COVID-19 among Adair County residents since January 1, 2020. The latest two cases involve a 38-year-old female and a 24-year-old male related to area meat-processing plants. As of today, 15 of those 47 individuals who tested positive previously have left isolation. There are now 32 active cases and no deaths.

To date, 1,270 people have been tested for COVID-19 in Adair County using lab tests, rapid ID Now tests and tests prior to surgical procedures.  Of those, 1,122 have had negative results, 57 have tested positive, and the results of 91 are still pending. Forty-seven of the 57 positives have been Adair County residents. The other 10 results are for individuals tested here but living outside Adair County.

The Adair County Health Department has made 275 contacts in its contact-tracing efforts. Staff continue to focus on contact tracing to reduce transmission of the virus by people who have tested positive.

 

CASES REACH 40 IN ADAIR COUNTY 

Kirksville, MO 5/22/2020 – As we head into the Memorial Day Weekend, one new case of COVID-19 has been reported to the Adair County Health Department, bringing the total number of cases since January 1, 2020 to 40. A 29-year-old female is the latest person to test positive for the virus. Twenty-eight county residents are now in isolation.

 

ADAIR COUNTY COVID-19 CASE UPDATE

Kirksville, MO 5/21/2020 – Two new cases of COVID-19 today involve a 58-year-old female and a 27-year-old female, bringing total cases in Adair County to 39. Twenty-seven people are currently in isolation. One of the two cases is an employee of an area meat processing plant; the other is not.

The Adair County Health Department has contacted 186 people who have had close contact with individuals who have tested positive to date and continues contact-tracing efforts to help slow transmission of the virus.

“COVID-19 continues to spread in our community,” said Jim LeBaron, administrator of the Adair County Health Department. “Every resident of the county bears a responsibility to take every precaution possible to protect others. We all have to do what we can to slow the spread,” he said.

Public Health